Month: March 2018

IMPACT@Work: Supportive Coworkers

Managing dynamics with co-workers can be complicated enough without the added influence of a mental illness on one of you. Are you friends? Are you just people who spend most of your day together but don’t really know each other? What boundaries are in place as far as discussing your personal life? All these questions are difficult to answer right away, and the answers can often change over time, depending on how closely you work together. Add a mental health issue for one party (or both), and the dynamics are further complicated.  (more…)

Advertisements

IMPACT@Work: Power Dynamics and Corporate Conduct (Anonymous)

What happens when your workplace touts itself as being mental-health friendly, and emphasizes the importance of empowerment, open communication, support and diversity, but misses the mark in reality? What happens when you’re the only one to realize this, and you’re forced to address power dynamics and unfair practices while dealing with your own mental health concerns?

This post is written anonymously, because we unfortunately still live in a world where there are consequences to speaking out against organizational injustices, and the repercussions of speaking publicly are too costly. That does not make this story any less important or valid; in fact, the opposite is true. 

(more…)

IMPACT@Work: Managers and Mental Health

When thinking about the changes that need to happen to make mental health a more acceptable topic at work, we often consider the high level changes that need to happen in company policies to make our workplaces more accepting. The idea is that the macrocosm of driving better corporate policies and laws will in turn have a trickle down effect and impact our day-to-day work lives. We are a long way from that happening, and there are great initiatives by larger mental health organizations spearheading this change. What I want to focus on today, is the reverse of this idea.

(more…)

IMPACT@Work: Sidney S. Billings – Certified Protection Officer

Sidney and I connected through LinkedIn a few months ago over one commonality: we are both passionate about being a Mental Health Advocate, and will have the tough conversations needed to drive change. When I approached him about IMPACT@Work, he was eager and open to share, and genuinely wants to make a change in the world. His story is one that many people share, and it is a story that we need to collectively work to change so that no one else is forced to feel like they have to hide. 


My first experience with negative remarks towards my mental health issues was in 1988 while I was working in Ottawa.
While in hospital to discover exactly the diagnosis of what I had, it was determined at that time I suffered from ADHD. This devastated me. I was scared to tell my employer and when I finally did, the response was less then acceptable.
The management labeled me crazy. Some of my co-workers called me dumb, stupid, and I felt like an outcast. 

(more…)